The Dark Side of Preworkouts

As we begin or even are years into our training, we are constantly trying to find ways to make gains, be as strong and fit as we used to be, and keep our declining energy levels on the up and up.

I don’t know about you, but at 34, I don’t have nearly the energy I had 10 years ago and with all of life’s stresses, sometimes it’s a struggle to even get into the gym at all.

So over the last few years I’ve been taking preworkout supplements to give me a little extra motivation and boost in the gym. And what started out as just drinking a Rockstar in the morning has turned into a daily dose (or two) of preworkout. Over time your body builds up a tolerance to these and it takes more and more to get you moving.

I actually decided to write this article due to the fact the number of people asking about preworkout supplements and are they safe.

To start preworkouts range from beginner ones all the way to extreme ones with sometimes ingredients that not even bodybuilding or powerlifting competitions allow.

The responses I got led me to believe that a lot more people are taking them than I thought and clearly this is an issue that holds an interest for my readers.
But I didn’t want to jump on the bandwagon and just talk about the benefits and instead looked into the other side of taking preworkout supplements. The dark side…
The dark side is all the preworkout supplement side effects you may or may not experience (or even be aware of).

If you are unfamiliar with preworkouts, any reputable supplement company or vitamin company will be able to show you, or if you search preworkout on Google this will pull them up as well.

These are all stimulants with ingredients ranging from caffeine, creatine, niacin, beta-alanine, betaine, taurine, tyrosine, yohimbe, and B vitamins with each carrying their own unique blend of some or all of these ingredients and dozens more. There are also ingredients like DMAE that are said to enhance workouts, but can be extremely addictive like the other stimulants but isn’t considered a stimulant.

People Think Long-Term! Pre Workout Supplements Are NOT Long-Term!

Taking any one of the these popular powders will most certainly give you a boost in energy, focus, motivation, and even strength. I do have to attribute a certain amount of these to the placebo effect, but overall, they do work.

In the short-term.

But you’re not interested in the short-term are you? You want to be healthy, fit, and energetic permanently, right?

As a nutritionist, I rarely if ever recommend my clients take a preworkout supplement (or any supplement for that matter unless either medically necessary like certain vitamins). Instead I teach the basics first:

• Get enough sleep
• Drink enough water
• Do strength and cardiovascular exercise regularly
• Eat high quality foods and in moderation
• Avoid junk, processed foods, refined sugar, and soda
• Eat lots of vegetables
• Get enough sunlight
• Stretch daily


In fact, our 92-day M.O.A.B. plan in BariatricA Premium, LLC is built entirely on the basis of sound nutrition, consistent exercise, and avoiding “quick” fixes like pre-workouts. It also is a fat loss and strength building plan.

I mean, you can’t reasonably expect to sleep for 5 hours per night, drink little or no water, eat a marginal diet, and then take a pre-workout supplement and expect to kill it in the gym and make incredible gains.

Not long-term anyway.

With that said, I will tell you that I have used and continue to use preworkout supplements and other than a protein powder, but I also do the right things to take care of my body and don’t just rely on the boost to get me through my workouts.

But for the freaks like me who want that rush of energy to help them through those brutal workouts and don’t mind throwing caution to the wind, be aware of some of the dangers that lie within.

It’s not all crazy energy and kick ass training sessions. There are downsides to taking preworkout supplements as well.

Please if you have any other questions about anything in this article please leave a comment below or send me a message at questionsbmf@gmail.com.

 

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